What is Bariatric Surgery?


what is gastric sleeve

Gastric Sleeve Procedure

 


There are three types of bariatric surgery; Gastric Bypass, Gastric Sleeve, and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty (LAP Band). These procedures are used to treat patients with clinically diagnosed obesity, which is a cause of diseases like Type II Diabetes, Coronary Disease, strokes, heart disease, sleep apnea, repertory problems, and various types of cancer, including prostate, breast, colon, and endometrium. Bariatric Surgery generally results in rapid weight loss, improved health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea, as well as an improved quality of life. Patients experience less pain and the ability to be more active.

There are two classifications for Bariatric Surgery: Restrictive and Malabsorbative.

Restrictive surgery physically restricts the size of the stomach, thereby slowing digestion and restricting the amount of food that can be eaten in one sitting. Gastric Sleeve and LAP Band are restrictive surgeries.

Malabsorbative surgery prevents calories from being absorbed by reducing the size of the stomach and removing part of the digestive track. Gastric Bypass is a malabsorbative surgery.

What is a Gastric Sleeve Gastrectomy?

75% of the stomach is removed to create a narrower pathway to the intestines, which thereby shrinks the size of the stomach and reduces the amount of food that can be eaten in one sitting.

 

What to expect: The procedure takes between 1 and 2 hours to complete under general anesthesia. The patient stays in the hospital for 3-5 nights and is generally able to return to work after 2-3 weeks. The patient will be able to start a liquid diet the day after surgery and slowly progress back to solid foods. After 2 years, patients report an average weight loss of 60-70% of excess bodyweight and keep the weight off 10 years after the operation with diet changes and regular exercise.

Am I a good candidate?

Candidates for Bariatric Surgery are typically at high-risk or have life-threatening conditions resulting from obesity, have tried and failed at traditional weight loss attempts, have a current Body Mass Index (BMI) greater than 40 (or above 35 in certain cases), and are 18 or older (although adolescents can be eligible in certain cases). Which particular Bariatric procedure is right for you depends on your specific case. Consult with your doctor and refer to the chart below to determine what your best option is.

BMI Recommended Calories

Will insurance cover Bariatric Surgery?

Insurance companies will cover the cost of bariatric surgery is the patient has Body Mass Index (MBI) of at least 35 with a life-threatening disease caused by obesity or at least 40 without a life threatening disease. Many companies will require the patient to attempt a supervised six-month weight loss program and may require the patient to have the procedure done at a certain location.

FAQ

1. How do I know I am getting a qualified surgeon?

While each country has their own specific certification and educational requirements, which are very comparable to the US, we need for our providers to be up to date on all required certifications and educational standards. We require that these certifications are viewable to you upon request.

2. What pre-op testing needs to be done?

During your consultation, your doctor will discuss any pre-op testing you may need. These may include blood tests, electrocardiograph (EKG), chest x-rays, sleep apnea screening, and an echocardiogram.

3. What is my Body Mass Index (BMI)?

Your Body Mass Index is used to estimate your body weight category. It does not give specific recommendations, but is used by your doctor as a starting point. Below is the formula to calculate your BMI.

BMI Scale

Under current US health insurance standards, patients who have a BMI of at least 35 and are considered either Severely or Morbidly Obese are candidates for Bariatric Surgery.

4. Am I too old for this procedure?

Talk with your doctor. Patients later in life have still had these procedures done and had successful results. However, some surgeons have a cut off age.

5. How much weight will I lose?

On average, patients lose between 50-70% of excess body weight after 2 years. With consistent exercise, patients are able to successfully keep the weight off 10 years out from the procedure.

6. How will I feel after the procedure?

Typically, patients experience a higher quality of life. Many patients report decreased depression, more confidence in social and public interactions, and more energy for a more active lifestyle.

7. What will I need to do after surgery?

Your surgeon will provide and review with you a comprehensive plan for you to follow. Generally, you will need to diet, monitor your weight loss, and watch for any nutritional deficiencies.

8. What are the general risks for this procedure?

Early risks include leakage of fluid through the staples used to hold the stomach together, which is rare but can cause infections, and an injury to the spleen, which is very uncommon. Late risks include the formation of ulcers in the stomach or intestines, which happens in 4% of patients and is more common in patients with a history of smoking or who take medication for arthritis. Diarrhea or abdominal cramps may occur but can be avoided by not eating foods that cause the problems. Mild vitamin or iron deficiencies happen in about 40% of patients but can be treated by taking an oral supplement.

9. How soon can I have the operation?

Most procedures can be scheduled for two weeks from the initial date of contact, but time can vary depending on what your destination is and what procedure your planning. Some procedures have been had for as few as three days from initial contact.

Follow-up Care

Following your chosen procedure, our providers take extra care to ensure you are recovering well. When you are 100% ready to travel, they will help you with all needs required for your flight back home.  Upon receiving your quote from your chosen provider, he/she will provide all details in average recovery time and where this will take place – hospital, clinic, hotel, etc.

If additional checkups/check-ins are required once you are back home, your chosen provider will let you know at the time of discharge. When and how frequently these follow-ups occur may vary depending on your specific case. However, we make every effort to ensure that your post procedure follow up is explained clearly, in both verbal and written form. We encourage you to keep your primary care physician and/or specialist up to date on all of your medical care. We will assist you by answering any questions that you or your doctor may have and help you locate a local provider for follow up care.

It is recommended that you take part in a program to maintain your diet and exercise, while feeling encouraged to maintain your weight loss. The best way to do this is to have regular meetings or check-ins with other bariatric patients or a local doctor.

 

what is gastric sleeve

 

There are three types of bariatric surgery; Gastric Bypass, Gastric Sleeve, and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty (LAP Band). These procedures are used to treat patients with clinically diagnosed obesity, which is a cause of diseases like Type II Diabetes, Coronary Disease, strokes, heart disease, sleep apnea, repertory problems, and various types of cancer, including prostate, breast, colon, and endometrium. Bariatric Surgery generally results in rapid weight loss, improved health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea, as well as an improved quality of life. Patients experience less pain and the ability to be more active.

There are two classifications for Bariatric Surgery: Restrictive and Malabsorbative.

Restrictive surgery physically restricts the size of the stomach, thereby slowing digestion and restricting the amount of food that can be eaten in one sitting. Gastric Sleeve and LAP Band are restrictive surgeries.

Malabsorbative surgery prevents calories from being absorbed by reducing the size of the stomach and removing part of the digestive track. Gastric Bypass is a malabsorbative surgery.

What is Gastric Sleeve Gastrectomy?

75% of the stomach is removed to create a narrower pathway to the intestines, which thereby shrinks the size of the stomach and reduces the amount of food that can be eaten in one sitting.

 

What to expect:The procedure takes between 1 and 2 hours to complete under general anesthesia. The patient stays in the hospital for 3-5 nights and is generally able to return to work after 2-3 weeks. The patient will be able to start a liquid diet the day after surgery and slowly progress back to solid foods. After 2 years, patients report an average weight loss of 60-70% of excess bodyweight and keep the weight off 10 years after the operation with diet changes and regular exercise.

Am I a good candidate?

Candidates for Bariatric Surgery are typically at high-risk or have life-threatening conditions resulting from obesity, have tried and failed at traditional weight loss attempts, have a current Body Mass Index (BMI) greater than 40 (or above 35 in certain cases), and are 18 or older (although adolescents can be eligible in certain cases). Which particular Bariatric procedure is right for you depends on your specific case. Consult with your doctor and refer to the chart below to determine what your best option is.

BMI Recommended Calories

Will insurance cover Bariatric Surgery?

Insurance companies will cover the cost of bariatric surgery is the patient has Body Mass Index (MBI) of at least 35 with a life-threatening disease caused by obesity or at least 40 without a life threatening disease. Many companies will require the patient to attempt a supervised six-month weight loss program and may require the patient to have the procedure done at a certain location.

FAQ

1. How do I know I am getting a qualified surgeon?

While each country has their own specific certification and educational requirements, which are very comparable to the US, we need for our providers to be up to date on all required certifications and educational standards. We require that these certifications are viewable to you upon request.

2. What pre-op testing needs to be done?

During your consultation, your doctor will discuss any pre-op testing you may need. These may include blood tests, electrocardiograph (EKG), chest x-rays, sleep apnea screening, and an echocardiogram.

3. What is my Body Mass Index (BMI)?

Your Body Mass Index is used to estimate your body weight category. It does not give specific recommendations, but is used by your doctor as a starting point. Below is the formula to calculate your BMI.

BMI Scale

Under current US health insurance standards, patients who have a BMI of at least 35 and are considered either Severely or Morbidly Obese are candidates for Bariatric Surgery.

4. Am I too old for this procedure?

Talk with your doctor. Patients later in life have still had these procedures done and had successful results. However, some surgeons have a cut off age.

5. How much weight will I lose?

On average, patients lose between 50-70% of excess body weight after 2 years. With consistent exercise, patients are able to successfully keep the weight off 10 years out from the procedure.

6. How will I feel after the procedure?

Typically, patients experience a higher quality of life. Many patients report decreased depression, more confidence in social and public interactions, and more energy for a more active lifestyle.

7. What will I need to do after surgery?

Your surgeon will provide and review with you a comprehensive plan for you to follow. Generally, you will need to diet, monitor your weight loss, and watch for any nutritional deficiencies.

8. What are the general risks for this procedure?

Early risks include leakage of fluid through the staples used to hold the stomach together, which is rare but can cause infections, and an injury to the spleen, which is very uncommon. Late risks include the formation of ulcers in the stomach or intestines, which happens in 4% of patients and is more common in patients with a history of smoking or who take medication for arthritis. Diarrhea or abdominal cramps may occur but can be avoided by not eating foods that cause the problems. Mild vitamin or iron deficiencies happen in about 40% of patients but can be treated by taking an oral supplement.

9. How soon can I have the operation?

Most procedures can be scheduled for two weeks from the initial date of contact, but time can vary depending on what your destination is and what procedure your planning. Some procedures have been had for as few as three days from initial contact.

Follow-up Care

Following your chosen procedure, our providers take extra care to ensure you are recovering well. When you are 100% ready to travel, they will help you with all needs required for your flight back home.  Upon receiving your quote from your chosen provider, he/she will provide all details in average recovery time and where this will take place – hospital, clinic, hotel, etc.

If additional checkups/check-ins are required once you are back home, your chosen provider will let you know at the time of discharge. When and how frequently these follow-ups occur may vary depending on your specific case. However, we make every effort to ensure that your post procedure follow up is explained clearly, in both verbal and written form. We encourage you to keep your primary care physician and/or specialist up to date on all of your medical care. We will assist you by answering any questions that you or your doctor may have and help you locate a local provider for follow up care.

It is recommended that you take part in a program to maintain your diet and exercise, while feeling encouraged to maintain your weight loss. The best way to do this is to have regular meetings or check-ins with other bariatric patients or a local doctor.

 

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  • 760 Old Roswell Road, Suite 243
    Roswell, GA 30076

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